Second Eclipse and Fort Negley’s Future

Councilman John Cooper (c) spoke about a Ft. Negley controversy at John A's July Breakfast as emcees Walter Hunt, Charlie Cardwell and Joe Hobbs look on.

Councilman John Cooper (c) spoke about a Ft. Negley controversy at John A’s July Breakfast as emcees Walter Hunt, Charlie Cardwell and Joe Hobbs look on.

Lin Folk, who just turned 100, wrote Dru’s Vues, “I am about to see the complete eclipse of the sun for the second time! I saw my first one on Sept. 21, 1922.  I was five years old, and my mother and father took me to see the eclipse.”

She said her family drove their Maxwell automobile about 100 miles from LA to view the eclipse from a hillside near San Diego.

Eclipses always occur in the middle of the day. “Sure enough!” Folk continued:  “The moon came along first then everything got dark, and the stars came out.  It wasn’t quite as dark as nighttime because of lights nearby, but it was dark enough.  Just as they do before dawn, the roosters began to crow.”

Folk may be a rare person who has seen a solor eclipse twice in her lifetime!

Dru’s Vues sure hopes to hear those roosters crowing this time!

Write Ms. Lin Folk care of The Meadows, 8044 Coley Davis Road, Nashville.

Ft Negley: At John A’s breakfast, Councilman John Cooper, chairman of the Metro Council’s Budget and Finance Committee, made his case to preserve Nashville’s historic Ft. Negley from planned development.
For many years the lower Ft. Negley property has served the Nashville community first as a picnic ground then as Greer Stadium.  Free blacks built the Civil War fortification for the Union.  Many workers who died during the construction are buried on the lower property.

According to Cooper, Mayor Megan Barry’s administration has plans to redevelop the Greer Stadium property.  The Council, however, has already appropriated funds to tear down the stadium and create a park.
“The half million square feet under Greer Stadium is worth $40 million,” Cooper said.  (He might have been referring to a Metro appraisal valued at $31.8 million.) Cooper was not supportive of a developer’s current offer of $1 million over 7 years. He also said the deal-making for the property lacked transparency.

A spokesman for the administration told The Tennessean that the developer would preserve Ft Negley while also offering affordable housing and entrepreneurial opportunities.

The next two 2017 Metro Council meetings are scheduled for Aug. 15 and Sept. 5.

Field of Honor: Former Metro Councilman Phil Ponder has announced the next Field of Honor will be Nov. 8-12 on Veterans Day Weekend.

One thousand American flags will be on display on the Victory Field facing Lebanon Road at Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage, 4580 Rachel’s Lane.

Contact Phil Ponder at panddponder@bellsouth.net for further information.

Contact Drucilla Smith at drucillasmith@outlook.com