Iconic portraits preserve faces of veterans

GCA Staff | GCA News

Nationally recognized photographer Thomas Sanders with war veteran Elza Smith. - photo submitted

Nationally recognized photographer Thomas Sanders with war veteran Elza Smith. – photo submitted

Italian philosopher, essayist, poet and novelist George Santayana is credited with the saying, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” As veterans were remembered on Saturday for their service to our country, it is important that they aren’t forgotten the other 351 days of the year.

Archibald “Archie” Mosley U.S. Marines Corps, 1943-1947

Archibald “Archie” Mosley U.S. Marines Corps, 1943-1947

Nationally recognized photographer Thomas Sanders is doing in his part is telling veterans’ stories through his camera lenses to capture and preserve the faces of many war veterans.

Belmont Village Green Hills first commissioned Sanders in 2008 for its American Heroes: Portraits of Service project to remember the many war veterans that reside throughout its communities.

William “Bill” Griswold U.S. Navy, 1945-1946

William “Bill” Griswold
U.S. Navy, 1945-1946

Recently, on his third visit to Belmont Village Green Hills, Sanders photographed 15 veterans. One is Archibald “Archie” Mosley, a WWII veteran who is among one of the first African-American to join the Marines Corp.

The group became known as the Montford Point Marines and was eventually integrated into the U.S. Marine Corps. In 2012, he was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress.

Sanders work culminated in an award-winning book in 2010, The Last Good War: The Faces and Voices of WWII.

The iconic portraits taken by Sanders, along with a bit of their service history, will be permanent displayed in a gallery within the community scheduled to open in January.

To see more veteran portraits by Thomas Sanders, visit tomsandersphoto.com